Kin Caregivers and the Pandemic

by Glenda Clare • While COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for all North Carolinians, grandfamilies have been especially hard hit. More than 89,000 North Carolina children and youth are members of grandfamilies created when a grandparent or other family member raises the child of a relative unable or unwilling to parent. Although most heads of grandfamilies are under age 60

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For kinship families, shared parenting can be complicated

by Glenda Clare • Shared parenting was my goal when I decided to assume the custody of my cousin’s youngest child. To be supportive, I accompanied my cousin to Child and Family Team (CFT) meetings and paid for required drug testing. In my head, I was singing Sister Sledge’s “We Are Family.” I knew everything was going to be alright

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Providing kinship care outside the child welfare system? You are not alone

by Glenda Clare • Grandparents and other relatives (often referred to as kinship caregivers or heads of grandfamilies) often assume custody after receiving a call from a concerned neighbor or visiting and finding dirty, unfed children alone in a messy home. In times of crisis, relatives step in to care for the children. Parental abuse of alcohol and other drugs,

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Licensed Kinship Care in NC

Licensed kinship care resembles nonrelative foster care. In both, the county DSS has legal custody of the children. Like all states, NC has requirements (e.g., training, background checks, etc.) that non-kin foster parents must meet before they can care for children in foster care. In NC, kinship caregivers must meet these same requirements to be licensed as a foster parent.

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